Feuerbach’s Concept of Religious Alienation and Its Influence

Authors

  • Sujit Debnath Institute of Chartered Financial Analysts of India (ICFAI) University, Tripura

Keywords:

Feuerbach, Hegel, it's

Abstract

The present study is an attempt to revisit how Feuerbach discusses the concept of alienation from religious point of view. According to Feuerbach, Religion and God do not exist beyond the human reach; rather they are the creation of human being. True religion is the relation of man with himself or with his own true nature. God according to Feuerbach is the manifested inward nature of man. But when man cannot understand that the religion and God are nothing but the creation of human being, he becomes alienated from his actual nature. Worshiping external God is nothing but expression of human emotion. If God is regarded as something different from man, man becomes separated from his own true nature and ultimately he becomes alienated. In other words, if human essence is considered as truly belongs to God who exists beyond human reach, man becomes alienated from himself. Later on Marx regards this religious alienation as means of capitalists’ process of exploitation. In other words, with the help of religious alienation capitalists’ perpetuate their class exploitation. Thus, the present work will mainly focus on Feuerbach’s concept of religious alienation and how subsequently Marx has adopted and critically analyzed this concept of religious alienation in his philosophy.

Author Biography

Sujit Debnath, Institute of Chartered Financial Analysts of India (ICFAI) University, Tripura

Assistant Professor of Philosophy, Faculty of Liberal Arts, Institute of Chartered Financial Analysts of India (ICFAI) University, Kamalghat, Agartala, West Tripura.

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Published

2021-08-10

How to Cite

Debnath, S. (2021). Feuerbach’s Concept of Religious Alienation and Its Influence. Tattva Journal of Philosophy, 13(1). Retrieved from https://journals.christuniversity.in/index.php/tattva/article/view/2967